2022 Agenda

Schedule is Subject to Change

Monday, October 3, 2022
6:00 AM - 12:00PM
Meeting Space Set-Up
1:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Exhibitor & Poster Installation (Move-In)
4:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Early Registration Open
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Student Rehearsals
Tuesday, October 4, 2022
7:30 AM
Exhibit Hall Opens
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
Registration & Continental Breakfast
Breakfast Sponsored By
DeWind One Pass
8:30 AM - 8:40 AM
Welcome and Opening Remarks
Mike Balzano, BNP Media
Dr. Shaily Mahendra, University of California, Los Angeles
8:40 AM – 9:30 AM
Keynote PFAS Challenges and Opportunities: Academic and Consulting Perspectives
Dr. Chris Higgins, Colorado School of Mines
Dr. Rula Deeb, Geosyntec Consultants
Sponsored By
EA Engineering
9:30 AM - 10:05 AM
Introduction to the Student Program and Student Flash Poster Presentations
Megan Houlihan, Geosyntec Consultants
10:05 AM - 10:35 AM
Morning Networking Break
Sponsored By
Burns & McDonnell

Track #1 PFAS Treatment Advance

Track Chair: Dr. Timothy Strathmann, Colorado School of Mines
John LaChance, TerraTherm, Inc., a Cascade Company
Due to the strong carbon-fluorine bonds, per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are highly resistant to biological and chemical degradation, particularly perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). Since options for treatment are limited due to the recalcitrance of PFAAs, ex situ treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC) is common with thermal treatment processes used for destruction. As a result, management of PFAS sites is often very costly, and some of the PFAAs may break through GAC canisters more quickly than PFOA and PFOS, raising some concerns. Research efforts for treatment technologies have included treatment for in situ groundwater, ex situ groundwater, investigation-derived waste, and wastewater. Current research efforts aim to understand the degradation processes better and develop new remediation technologies to treat PFAS. The science and technologies surrounding the environmental characterization and remediation of PFAS are constantly developing. This session includes an evaluation of thermal treatment for impacted soil and the conditions for safe incineration from waste streams, a case study of a passive in situ remediation method for PFAS in water, and a demonstration of foam fractionation for removal of PFAS from source zones.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify thermal decomposition processes.
  2. Identify site conditions where passive in situ remedies may be viable for the treatment of mobile, persistent compounds (e.g., PFAS, 1,4-dioxane) in groundwater and surface water.
  3. Describe foam fractionation and how it harnesses the power of bubbles to remove PFAS.
  4. Discuss some considerations for scaling up the process to treat large volumes of PFAS-laden soil piles.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 2.5 PDH; 2.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.2 IACET CEU

Track #2 Groundwater Remediation Using Abiotic and Biotic Processes: The Latest Results from the Lab to the Field

Track Chair: Dr. Mark Widdowson, Virginia Tech
Chemical oxidation remediation involves the application of a chemical oxidant, commonly permanganate, persulfate, or hydrogen peroxide, to degrade a wide range of contaminants. Chemical reduction remedial approaches use reducing compounds such as zero-valent metals like iron or zinc, iron minerals, or other reductants such as polysulfides and may include the application of nanoparticles. Although generally considered as separate treatment methods, chemical reduction and oxidation can be used as complementary remedies for contaminants. This session will look at some of the biological and abiotic transformation processes that are occurring, including in low permeability matrices, and present a case study of the application of ISCO, S-ISCO, and enhanced reductive dechlorination technologies in rapid succession.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss the importance of abiotic reactivity in natural systems for degradation.
  2. Identify naturally occurring minerals that promote degradation in low permeability environments.
  3. Identify key factors when applying chemical reduction and oxidation as complementary remedies.
  4. Expore how and why surfactants might be used as part of in situ chemical oxidation remedies.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 2.5 PDH; 2.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.2 IACET CEU

Track #3 Managing Emerging Contaminants in Drinking Water, Wastewater and Surface Water

Track Chair: Dr. Michael Wong, Rice University
Managing emerging contaminants (ECs) is a complex task as the framework to define, characterize, detect and regulate these compounds is not fixed. This session looks at the identification of new and emerging ECs with a review of current approaches and strategies to develop regulatory frameworks. This session includes presentations on some of the interactions between various ECs in the environment, tools to aid in the detection of ECs such as microplastics, as well as possible ways to remediate ECs or reduce the release of these compounds into the environment.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify three challenges in regulating contaminants of emerging concern.
  2. Discuss some of the commonalities and uniqueness among frameworks for evaluating CEC.
  3. Describe Bioretention cells and how they work.
  4. Explain some of the key limitations to monitoring microplastics.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 2.5 PDH; 2.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.2 IACET CEU
10:35 AM – 11:15 AM
Track #1
Track Keynote Treatment Train Approach for Effective PFAS Remediation: Coupling Sequestration and Separation Treatment with Destructive Technologies
Dr. Megan Hart, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Track #2
Track Keynote Chemical Reduction and Oxidation as Complementary Remedies for Contaminants: From Chlorinated Solvents to PFAS
Dr. Paul G. Tratnyek, Oregon Health & Science
Track #3
Track Keynote A Framework for Evaluating Emerging Substances of Concern
Dr. Andrew McQueen, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center
11:15 AM – 11:45 AM
Track #1
Platform PFAS Remedy Design and Implementation in Challenging Hydrogeological Settings
Chris Shores, Geosyntec Consultants
Track #2
PlatformIron Cycling and the Role of Reduced Iron Species in Promoting Abiotic Transformations of Chlorinated Ethenes in Groundwater
Dr. Charles Werth, University of Texas at Austin
Track #3
Platform Fate of Stormwater Emerging Contaminants in Bioretention Cells
Dr. Elodie Passeport, University of Toronto
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM
Track #1
PlatformHarnessing the Power of Bubbles to Remove PFAS from Plumes and Source Zones
Tracy Dannell, Geosyntec Consultants
Track #2
PlatformLaboratory and Field Validation of Min- Traps for Collection and Analysis of Reactive Iron Sulfide Minerals for Abiotic CVOC Degradation
Dr. Craig Divine, Arcadis
Track #3
PlatformKinetics and Thermodynamics of Interactions between Microplastics and PFAS in Water
Dr. Adeyemi Adeleye, University of California, Irvine
12:15 PM - 1:40 PM
Summit Luncheon
Sponsored By
ECT2
1:40 PM – 2:10 PM
Track #1
PlatformIncineration of Perfluoroalkyl Carboxylic Acids: A Thermal Stability Ranking Among Common Organic Chemicals
Dr. Anthony Rappé , Colorado State University
Track #2
PlatformSequential Application of Surfactant-Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation (S-ISCO), ISCO and Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation (EISB)
Leah MacKinnon, Geosyntec Consultants
Track #3
PlatformDiscovery of a Novel Sulfolane-Degrading Bacterium through Lab-and Field-Scale Studies
Dr. Trent Key, ExxonMobil E&PS
2:10 PM – 2:40 PM
Track #1
Platform Treatment of PFAS in a Soil Pile: Field Demonstration
Track #2
PlatformQuantifying the Contribution of Biological Processes in the Treatment of Chlorinated Ethenes from Low Permeability Media
Dr. Natalie Capiro, Auburn University
Track #3
Platform Smartphone-Enabled Rapid Quantification of Microplastics
Dr. Sanjay Mohanty, University of California, Los Angeles
2:40 PM – 2:45 PM
Track #1
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Hydrothermal PFAS Destruction - From the Laboratory to the Field
Dr. Brian Pinkard, Aquagga, Inc.
2. Testing and Implementation of a Passive Barrier/In Situ Treatment System for PFAS in Surface and Shallow Groundwater
Moses Ajemigbitse, AquaBlok, Ltd
4. Field-Scale Treatability Study - Soil Washing of PFAS-Contaminated Soils Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado
Steve Becker, Brice Engineering
4. PFAS Water Treatment: A Perspective on Pretreatment
Becca Vermace, Barr Engineering
Track #2
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Best Practices for the Design and Dosing of Permeable Reactive Barriers Incorporating Sulfidated Zero Valent Iron
Dr. John Freim, REGENESIS
2. Applying Injection Techniques to Enhance or Eliminate Construction of a Passive Reactive Barrier at Two Sites
Track #3
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Powder-Activated Carbon Promotes Persulfate Activation to Degrade PFOA and 1,4-Dioxane at Room Temperature
Dr. Katherine Manz, Brown University
2. Overcoming the Challenges of Microplastics in Stormwater
Sarah Mass, Haley & Aldrich, Inc.
3. Understanding the Macro Problem that is Microplastics
Alexandra Ambrosino, Geosyntec Consultants
2:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Afternoon Networking Break

Track #4 PFAS Sampling Challenges and Opportunities

Track Chair: Dr. Kasia Grzebyk, Exponent
The session will discuss the latest insights linked to measuring various PFAS, either relying on active or passive sampling. While grab sampling has been the standard approach to site characterization, recent developments in passive sampling implies that some of these samplers are now ready to be used in the field. No matter the sampling approach, a more complete characterization of PFAS in the environment has emerged with suspect screening, and non-target approaches, aided by instrument and workflow improvements.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss why a diffusion-based passive sampler is a good candidate for quantification of dissolved PFAS due to the characteristics of PFAS compounds.
  2. Compare and contrast passive sampler results to those obtained from traditional grab sampling.
  3. Explore how these analytical tools compare and work together to provide a more comprehensive picture of PFAS contamination.
  4. Explain a non-target analysis for PFAS compounds and how it is helping to further the understanding of PFAS in the environment.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 1.5 PDH; 1.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.1 IACET CEU

Track #5 Vapor Intrusion: Lessons Learned Following Three Decades of Mitigation

Track Chair: Brent O'Dell, Wood Environment & Infrastructure Solutions, Inc.
This session focuses on the lessons learned following decades of vapor intrusion mitigation. The topics covered include the regulatory inconsistencies and unscientific assumptions that are applied with respect to vapor intrusion and the implications this has on developing residential properties. There will be a presentation on using empirical data collected at vapor intrusion sites to improve risk-based decision making.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss what type of arbitrary assumptions take ideal residential development sites off the market.
  2. Describe how empirical data can help in making risk-based decisions.
  3. Identify types of engineering controls that might be used to manage long-term liabilities.
  4. Recognize concerns that developers face with respect to inconsistencies from regulatory agencies.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 1.5 PDH; 1.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.1 IACET CEU

Track #6 Risk Management and Remediation Approaches at Sites Impacted by LNAPL

Track Chair:
3:15 PM – 3:55 PM
Track #4
Track KeynoteActive vs Passive: PFAS Sampling Challenges and Opportunities
Dr. Rainer Lohmann, University of Rhode Island
Track #5
Track Keynote Utilizing Empirical Data to Improve Risk-Based Decision Making at Vapor Intrusion Sites
Robert Ettinger, Geosyntec Consultants
Track #6
Track Keynote Different Countries, Same Science: Concawe's Web-Based Toolbox for Quantitative Assessments of LNAPL Risk Management and Remediation
Tim Greaves, ExxonMobil
3:55 PM – 4:25 PM
Track #4
Platform PFASsive™: An Equilibrium Passive Sampler for PFAS in Sediment Pore Water and Surface Water!
Track #5
PlatformConceptualizing Vapor Transport, Entry, and Mitigation: New Understandings for Old Pathways
Dr. Kelly Pennell, University of Kentucky
Track #6
PlatformGetting to Closure” at Petroleum Impacted Sites More Confidently and More Sustainably
Matthew Lahvis, Shell Oil Products U.S.
4:25 PM – 4:55 PM
Track #4
Platform In-Depth Characterization of PFAS in Wastewater, a More Comprehensive Analysis
Taryn McKnight, Eurofins Environment Testing America
Track #5
PlatformRegulatory Inconsistencies, Unscientific Assumptions Regarding Vapor Intrusion Sharply Impede Home-Building in California
Peter H. Weiner, Cox, Castle & Nicholson
Track #6
PlatformLessons Learned from 30 Years at a Complex LNAPL Site
Dr. Mark Widdowson, Virginia Tech
4:55 PM – 5:00 PM
Track #4
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Dual Membrane Passive Diffusion Bag Sampling for PFAS Groundwater Samples
Paul Caprio, EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC
2. PFAS in Landfill Leachates: Sources, Occurrence, Patterns and Issues
3. Developing Novel Onsite Handheld Biosensors for PFAS Constituents
Track #5
Track #6
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Welcome Reception on Exhibit Hall Floor
Wednesday, October 5, 2022
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
Registration & Continental Breakfast

Track #7 Whose PFAS Is It? The Evolving Field of PFAS Forensics

Track Chair: Dr. Kristin Robrock, Exponent
Dr. Adam Love, Roux Associates
Environmental forensics is the application of scientific techniques to identify the source and historical reconstruction of contamination releases to develop defensible scientific and legal conclusions. Given the widespread use of PFAS-containing materials and the growing litigation over their presence in the environment, there is a clear and immediate need for PFAS source attribution. This session focuses on the evolving field of PFAS forensics, including the evaluation of new approaches such as machine learning techniques and converging lines of evidence used to differentiate PFAS sources.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize the types of challenges that arise in applying forensic techniques to PFAS sites.
  2. Explain the types of methods that could be involved in PFAS source tracking.
  3. Express why pattern recognition is necessary for recognizing PFAS sources from composition in environmental samples.
  4. Summarize some of the pitfalls that might arise from machine learning methods.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 1.5 PDH; 1.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.1 IACET CEU

Track #8 1,4-Dioxane Treatment: The Latest and Greatest

Track Chair: Nick Garson, Boeing
1,4-Dioxane is associated with chlorinated solvent sites and presents a significant remediation challenge due to its mobility and persistence. This session will provide an update on the current advances in 1,4 Dioxane treatments including a presentation on combined technologies for treating 1,4-dioxane and co-contaminants as well as implementation of bioaugmentation and cometabolism at portions of the site provides a feasible remedy for 1,4-dioxane source areas.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify some of the sources of 1,4-Dioxane in the environment and what its fate is.
  2. Explore some of the challenges to remediation of 1.4-Dioxane.
  3. Discuss some of the technologies that can be combined for treating 1,4-dioxane.
  4. Describe how bioaugmentation and cometabolism can provide a feasible remedy for 1,4-dioxane source areas.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 1.5 PDH; 1.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.1 IACET CEU

Track #9 Contaminants of Emerging Concern: Status of Findings from ITRC's Project Team

Track Chair: Patricia Reyes, Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC)
The Interstate Technology Regulatory Council has a team working on Contaminants of Emerging Concern. The team is working to create a framework for anticipating and responding to emerging contaminants, built on lessons learned from the emergence of PFAS and coupled with proactive identification of potential future contaminants. The objectives of this team are to develop a series of fact sheets that 1) address how states can track and identify contaminants of emerging concern to better manage them, 2) address the properties and traits that lead to identification, and 3) provide guidance for evaluating these properties. This session will present update on the team’s progress with a focus on the status, findings and surveys conducted to date.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss what is in a name – how the team defined the acronym of CECs for this guidance document.
  2. Describe what mechanisms are being considered to identify and evaluate the thousands of contaminants worldwide for which there is still much uncertainty in their potential hazard.
  3. Efforts at the federal level often generate data and findings that have ripple effects down to the states, but there is no clear guidance or consensus on how states should evaluate or manage this information – explore what the fact sheets are trying to do to help with this.
  4. Recognize the focus of the fact sheets and how is the guidance document being structured.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 1.5 PDH; 1.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.1 IACET CEU
8:30 AM – 9:10 AM
Track #7
Track Keynote Identifying Diagnostic Chemical Fingerprints from Different PFAS Source Types by Integrating Broad Sample Characterization and Machine Learning Techniques
Dr. Damian Helbling, Cornell University
Track #8
Track Keynote You Don’t Have to do it Alone: Combined Technologies for Treating 1,4-dioxane and Co-contaminants
Track #9
Session Status, Findings and Surveys from ITRC's Contaminants of Emerging Concern Team
Dr. Vivek Mathrani, California Department of Toxic Substances Control
Paula Panzino, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality
9:10 AM – 9:40 AM
Track #7
Platform Persistent, Perfluorinated, Perplexing: PFAS Forensics
Dr. Joseph Charbonnet, Iowa State University
Track #8
PlatformEnhanced Microbial Treatment of 1,4-Dioxane in a Mixed-Contaminant Source Zone via Bioaugmentation and Cometabolism
Dr. Mitch Olson, Trihydro Corporation
Track #9
Session Status, Findings and Surveys from ITRC's Contaminants of Emerging Concern Team
CONTINUED
9:40 AM – 10:10 AM
Track #7
Platform Supervised Machine Learning Pattern Recognition for Source Identification Based on PFAS Composition in Environmental Samples
Dr. Tohren Kibbey, University of Oklahoma
Track #8
Platform1,4-Dioxane Site Conceptual Models: Lessons Learned from 30 Sites
Dr. David Lipson, HRS Water Consultants, Inc.
Track #9
Session Status, Findings and Surveys from ITRC's Contaminants of Emerging Concern Team
CONTINUED
10:10 AM – 10:15 AM
Track #7
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Source Identification and Management of PFAS in Stormwater
2. Background PFAS Deposition and Implications
Track #8
1. TBD

Track #9
Session Status, Findings and Surveys from ITRC's Contaminants of Emerging Concern Team
CONTINUED
10:15 AM - 10:45 AM
Morning Networking Break
10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
Panel DiscussionEnvironmental Restoration:
Research Progress and Remaining Challenges
Chair Gregory Gervais, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Panelists Dr. Richard Anderson, U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer Center
Jim Cummings, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Dr. Elizabeth Edwards, University of Toronto
Dr. Kurt Pennell, Brown University
12:15 PM - 1:45 PM
Summit Luncheon
Luncheon Roundtable Discussion
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) What is it? What does it mean to us as Environmental professionals and to you personally? Did you know that 18% of environmental professions are racial and/or ethnic minorities and 32% of environmental professions are women, but only 13% of board members are women? How can we improve this as an industry, for your company, and for yourself personally?

Come join Integral for lunch as we discuss these questions and more importantly how we can personally effect change, raise awareness of our unconscious biases and promote a diverse and inclusive workforce.
Roundtable Discussions during Lunch Facilitated and Sponsored By:
Integral

Track #10 PFAS Toxicity Issues

Track Chair: Dr. Tami McMullin, CTEH
This session wil review the issues of evaluating the toxicity of PFAS and implications this has on regulations. It is becoming increasingly clear that PFAS are ubiquitous within the environment. Furthermore, fluorinated chemistry function was primarily focused on product retardant and water proofing, these functions carryover to environmental impacts which has resulted in legacy contaminants and significant environmental persistence. With this in mind, short-term ecotoxicity experiments are of limited value when assessing PFAS impacts to aquatic receptors. This session includes a study evaluating the reproducibility of findings from a previous investigation of multigenerational PFOS exposure in zebrafish which reported effects at exposure levels nearly two orders of magnitude lower for the species than observed in other published studies. In addition, a review of a full-life cycle test (~300 days) with fathead minnow exposed to PFOS and PFOS mixtures is presented to provide critical data for regulatory agencies.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe mechanisms for accumulation of PFAS in birds.
  2. Examine the distribution of different PFAS classes in birds.
  3. Identify the types of differences that there are in PFAS accumulation in inter-species.
  4. Discuss some of the ecotoxicological effects of long-term PFOS and PFOS mixture exposure to the fathead minnow.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 2.5 PDH; 2.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.2 IACET CEU

Track #11 Advances in Site Characterization and Amendment Delivery Methodologies at Contaminated Sites

Track Chair: Drew Baird, FRx
This session focuses on advances in site characterization and amendment delivery methodologies at contaminated sites including using tools such as the Waterloo Aquifer Profiling System and the Membrane Interface Probe/Hydraulic Profiling Tool (MiHPT), hydraulic fracturing to deliver amendments at low- permeability sites, using a solid sulfate source to achieve a stable, uniform sulfate concentration to enhance biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater and using an injectable controlled release oxidant designed to mitigate contaminant rebounding.

Learning Objectives
  1. Although sulfate delivery to enhance biodegradation of hydrocarbons in groundwater is a viable remedial technology, explore some of the challenges in implementing and sustaining enhanced biodegradation over time.
  2. Describe how hydraulic fracturing can help reduce uncertainty in remediating low permeability formations.
  3. Explain how the injectable controlled release oxidant achieved the mitigation of rebounding.
  4. Identify some of the advantages of using the Waterloo sampler to characterize a site.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 2.5 PDH; 2.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.2 IACET CEU

Track #12 Advances in Biological Treatment Approaches

Track Chair: Dr. Jim Spain, University of West Florida
Dr. Elizabeth Edwards, University of Toronto
Biological treatment for groundwater and wastewater has been around for a long time. In situ bioremediation is the biological treatment of contaminants in the environment. This session will look at some of the advances in biological treatment approaches. Aerobic cometabolism of organic pollutants has been studied for more than 50 years yet is rarely considered a primary remediation approach or a critical component of natural attenuation. This session will provide an overview of the fundamentals of cometabolic processes and examples of successful field applications of this approach for treating traditional and emerging contaminants. Electron donors are often added at sites to enhance bioremediation, and a study of novel electron donors, sourced from waste products will be presented. A case study of biosparging to treat novel substituted nitroaromatic compounds will be presented as well as a case studies using phytoforensics to indicate potential vapor intrusion and human health risks.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe some of the fundamentals of cometabolic processes.
  2. Discuss some of the key components of an electron donor for increasing microbial activity.
  3. Explain how real-time sensor measurements can be used to evaluate biodegradation zones.
  4. Define phytoforensics.
Registered Continuing Education Program AIA Continuing Education Provider IACET Accredited Provider PDH Continuing Education Provider
Earn: 2.5 PDH; 2.5 AIA LU/Elective; 0.2 IACET CEU
1:45 PM – 2:25 PM
Track #10
Track KeynoteZebrafish Response to Low-Level PFOS Concentrations in a Multi-Generational Exposure
Dr. Kurt A. Gust, U.S. Army, Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)
Track #11
Track KeynoteUsing the Waterloo Aquifer Profiling System and the Membrane Interface Probe/Hydraulic Profiling Tool (MiHPT) to Define Contaminant Flux and Support Automated Injection Approaches
Eliot Cooper, Cascade Environmental, LLC
Track #12
Track KeynoteCometabolism Reconsidered
2:25 PM – 2:55 PM
Track #10
PlatformKey Issues on Ecological Risk Assessment of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)
Dr. Jean Zodrow, Geosyntec Consultants
Track #11
Platform Increasing Treatment Certainty While Controlling Remediation Cost: Case Studies Using Hydraulic Fracturing to Deliver Amendments at Low- Permeability Sites
Track #12
Platform Bioremediation of Novel Substituted Nitroaromatic Compounds: A Pilot-Scale Biosparging Field Demonstration
Dr. Andrea Hanson Rhoades, Colorado State University
2:55 PM – 3:25 PM
Track #10
PlatformInsights and Uncertainties in the Derivation and Use of PFAS Tissue-Based Toxicity Reference Values in Avian Species
Dr. John Newsted, Ramboll
Track #11
PlatformSulfate delivery to enhance biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater
Dr. Ravi Kolhatkar, Chevron Technical Center
Track #12
Platform Optimizing Injection Design for Full-Scale In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents
Dr. Laurie LaPat-Polasko, Matrix New World Engineering
3:25 PM - 3:55 PM
Afternoon Networking Break
3:55 PM – 4:25 PM
Track #10
Platform Ecotoxicological Effects of Long-Term PFOS and PFOS Mixture Exposure to the Fathead Minnow
Dr. Jamie Suski, EA Engineering, Science and Technology
Track #11
PlatformRemRx™ CRI: Controlled Release Injectable for Treatment of Low Permeability Zones
Dr. Alexis Wells Carpenter, AxNano Triad Growth Partners
Track #12
PlatformPhytoforensics: Delineating Emerging Fugitive Contaminants through Plant Sampling
Joel Burken, Missouri University of Science and Technology
4:25 PM – 4:55 PM
Track #10
Platform

Track #11
PlatformAdvanced Data Analytics, Forensics Framework and Demonstration for High Resolution Site Characterization at a DoD Facility
Jeff Bamer, CDM Smith
Track #12
Platform Rendered Animal Co-Products as Electron Donors for In Situ Bioremediation
Dr. Kevin Finneran, Clemson University
4:55 PM – 5:00 PM
Track #10
Track #11
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Detecting Vertical Contaminant Flowpaths in Bedrock
Kyle Spears,Aestus, LLC
2. Complex LNAPL Site Characterization Using 3D Data Visualization and the New Ultra-Violet Optical Image Profiler and Hydraulic Profile Tool (OiHPT-UV)
John Fontana, Vista GeoScience
3. Practical Approaches to ISCO Delivery Promote Informed Dosing Calculations Across Multiple Sites
John Hesemann, Burns & McDonnell
Track #12
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Bioremediation 4.0: What Procaryotic Microbes Can Really Accomplish and the Roll Quorum Sensing and Signaling (QSS) Plays
Hannah Anderson, TerraStryke Products LLC
2. Carbon Dioxide Efflux from Refinery Surface Impoundments
Douglas Soutter, Burns & McDonnell
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Networking Reception on Exhibit Hall Floor
Thursday, October 6, 2022
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
Registration & Continental Breakfast
8:30 AM - 8:35 AM
Welcome
Mike Balzano, BNP Media
Dr. Kurt Pennell,Brown University
8:35 AM - 9:25 AM
KeynoteImpacts of Early Life PFAS Exposure on Adolescent Health:
Preventing Exposure and Adverse Health Effects
Dr. Joseph Braun, Brown University
9:25 AM - 9:35 AM
Student Competition Award Winner Announcement
Megan Houlihan, Geosyntec Consultants
9:35 AM - 10:05 AM
Morning Networking Break

Track #13 Sustainable Firefighting System Cleanout and Transition to PFAS-Free Foams

Track Chairs: Dr. John La Scala, USARMY DEVCOM ARL (USA)
Richard Spiese, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation

Track #14 Management Approaches for Complex Sites

Track Chairs:
James L'Esperance, Integral Consulting
Dr. Julie Chambon, Geosyntec Consultants

Track #15 PFAS Sources, Fate and Transport Issues

Track Chair: Joe Aldridge, GeoEngineers, Inc.
Emily Stockwell, GSI
10:05 AM – 10:45 AM
Track #13
Track KeynoteAFFF to F3: Historical Review, Current Status and Future Outlook
Track #14
Track KeynoteCountdown to Closure: Strategy to Expedite Groundwater Remediation at DOE’s Sites
Dr. Carol Eddy-Dilek, U.S. Department of Energy (Savannah River National Laboratory)
Track #15
Track Keynote Assessment of PFAS in Collocated Soil and Porewater Samples at an AFFF-Impacted Source Zone: Field-Scale Validation of Suction Lysimeters
Dr. Richard Anderson, U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer Center
10:45 AM – 11:15 AM
Track #13
PlatformRemediation of AFFF-Impacted Fire Suppression Systems Using Conventional and Closed-Circuit Desalination Nanofiltration
Dr. Christopher Bellona, Colorado School of Mines
Track #14
Platform Completing the Picture: Incorporating Biogeochemical Models into Conceptual Site Models at Complex Sites
Dr. Erin Mack, Corteva
Track #15
PlatformMechanistic Understanding of PFAS in Source Zones
Dr. Thomas Wanzek, Oregon State University
11:15 AM – 11:45 AM
Track #13
PlatformPerfluorAd® Process for AFFF Cleanouts
Greg Knight, TRS Group
Track #14
Platform Multi-Media Remediation at the Nuclear Metals, Inc. Site
Bruce Thompson, de maximis
Track #15
PlatformRetention and Release of PFAS by Air-Water Interfaces in the Presence of Trapped Gas Bubbles
Dr. Kevin Mumford, Queen's University
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM
Track #13
PlatformPerformance Improvements of ADA PFAS-Free Foams Using New Additives
Dr. Sumaer Kamboj, ADA Technologies
Track #14
PlatformDOE’s ALTEMIS Project: Advanced Long Term Monitoring of Complex Groundwater Plumes
Dr. Hansell Gonzalez-Raymat, Department of Energy (Savannah River National Laboratory)
Track #15
PlatformA Surprise Source of Residual PFAS to Natural Water
12:15 PM – 12:20 PM
Track #13
Track #14
Track #15
Flash Poster Presentations 1. Applicability of Diverse Investigative Techniques for PFAS Remedial Investigations and Conceptual Site Model Development
Matthew Vest, Leidos, Inc.
12:20 PM - 1:15 PM
Summit Luncheon
1:15 PM
Exhibit Hall Closes
1:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Exhibitor and Posters Tear Down (Move-Out)
1:30 PM – 2:45 PM
Practioner Workshops

Assessing the Potential for Bias in PFAS Concentrations During Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling

Dr. Trever Schwichtenberg, Oregon State University

Elisabeth Hawley, Geosyntec Consultants

Amanda Struse, Jacobs
2:45 PM – 4:00 PM
Practioner Workshops

Evaluating and Applying Site-Specific NAPL Dissolution Rates During Remediation

Dr. Lloyd Stewart, Praxis Environmental Technologies, Inc

Dr. Julie Chambon, Geosyntec Consultants, Inc.
1:30 PM – 2:45 PM
Practioner Workshops

Technologies to Concentrate or Destroy PFAS

First Demonstration of Surface Active Foam Fraction (SAFF) for Treatment of PFAS-Impacted Landfill Lechate in the United States
Performance Summary: In Situ Colloidal Activated Carbon Treatment of PFAS-Impacted Groundwater
Dr. Paul Erickson, REGENESIS
Waste Minimization – Treating high volumes of PFAS-impacted water with minimal waste.
Dr. David Kempisty, ect2/Montrose Environmental Group
Destruction of PFAS using Supercritical Water Oxidation
Dr. Marc Deshusses, Duke University and 374Water
2:45 PM – 4:00 PM
Practioner Workshops

Disposal of PFAS-Impacted Wastes

Use of Class 1 Hazardous Waste Injection Wells for Aqueous PFAS Wastes
Frank Marine, Texas Molecular
Considerations for Evaluating PFAS Disposal Options
AnnieLu DeWitt, Clean Harbors
Long Term Reduction of Liability of PFAS wastes in arid RCRA Landfills
Jim Hubbard , U.S. Ecology
Simon Bell, U.S. Ecology
1:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Practioner Workshops

Status of Findings from ITRC's PFAS Project Team

Introduction to ITRC; ITRC TechReg Document Highlights; Overview of PFAS Sources
Richard Spiese, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
Surface Water Quality
Dr. Rula Deeb, Geosyntec Consultants
AFFF and Current Best Management Practices
Dan Griffiths, Parsons
Site Characterization; PFAS Fate and Transport
Dr. Mitch Olson, Trihydro
PFAS Treatment Approaches

 

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